A recent survey conducted by the Student Money Saver website has found that a large majority of students in the UK don’t consider their degree to be value for money.

With 75% of institutions now setting blanket fees of £9000 across all of their courses, 82% of the students surveyed believed that the highest fees did not correlate with the quality of their degrees. The majority of the students actually valued their degrees far lower, opting for between the £2000 and £6000 mark instead.

What the research did not question was whether, with hindsight, the students would still have undertaken their degrees. Looking back at research conducted by the Telegraph in 2013, only 58.4% felt that their degree wasn’t worth the full £9000 a year.

Furthermore, 86.2% would have been willing to enrol in university again. These students would have been the first students to be hit by the fee hike, finishing their first year. Yet only a year and a half later, these attitudes have changed significantly. It is possible that this is due to the change in teaching hours as university progresses. Some students would argue that as the amount of contact time drops, the fees should drop representatively.
Whilst the majority of the students surveyed in the Student Money Saver research were ultimately optimistic that their degree would increase their earning potential, a significant portion did not believe that they would ever earn enough to fully repay the cost of their fees.

With the upcoming general election in May, the cost of university in the future could be open to further change.

Survey: http://www.studentmoneysaver.co.uk/article/81-of-students-think-theyre-overpaying-tuition/