The advancement of modern technology makes the world seem smaller and more connected every day. Homebound individuals and leisurely browsers alike can peruse the online resources of one country while making friends in another, all from the comfort of their own homes.

Internet users may not be able to feel a cool breeze brush past their skin from a beach front in Dubai, or taste the salty sea water while on a speedboat in the Caribbean, but they can still experience one aspect of a dream holiday via online videos and pictures. This virtual, online world has become almost second nature to younger and older generations alike. Browsers can feel the thrill of a casino in Las Vegas without having to spend any real money, or go on a video tour of multiple European destinations without ever having to get on a plane.  The history and culture of every country imaginable have never been as accessible or as frequently explored as they are today, thanks to the growing ubiquity of the internet.

However, there is a danger: a disconnection that comes with an over-reliance on virtual exploration and a lack of actual physical exploration. Yet if a symbiosis between the two can be achieved, the possibilities are endless.

Indeed, one truth cannot be denied, and that is that the internet has done more to connect and unite people, ideas and cultures throughout the world than anyone living in a pre-internet age could ever have imagined.