Burglaries in Norfolk are at a 20-year low following the introduction of special crime-fighting measures by police.

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Between April 2012 – 2013, 1,372 burglaries were reported, a 73% reduction compared with the mid-1990s when over 5,000 were reported yearly.

The success is credited to Norfolk Police’s targeting of repeat offenders. The Integrated Offender Management scheme was introduced after statistics indicated that 10% of the county’s most prolific offenders commit 32% of crime.

In response, known criminals have been heavily scrutinised and causes of crime, such as drug addiction and unemployment, have been addressed. Consequently, 180 known offenders, dubbed the “Norfolk 180”, have committed 831 fewer offences.

County Police Commander Chief Superintendent Nick Dean told the Eastern Daily Press: “Home burglary rates in our county are now at some of the lowest levels recorded which is testament to some really focused work to reduce the impact of this crime.”

Chief Constable Phil Gormley added: “Norfolk’s communities should feel reassured that their county remains one of the very safest.”
There has also been a considerable decline in anti-social behaviour; 6,175 fewer incidents were reported, down to 31,799 from 37,974. Incidents of sexual assault are also down from 685 to 562, an 18% decline.

More broadly, figures from the Office of National Statistics show that Norfolk is one of the safest counties in England. Compared with the rest of the country, there are 44 crimes per year per 1,000 people in Norfolk, 23 less than the national average (67).