The Shorts 2011 were a chance for drama students to write and act in their own creations, with the final night featuring five, mostly comedy, plays.

The evening started with ‘A Truth Universally Acknowledged’, a re-imagining of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Set after the ending of the book, it focussed on Kitty’s attempts to get engaged. Despite the regency style being frequently explored, this was a very humorous rendition, especially due to Tina Baston’s portrayal of the marriage obsessed Mrs Bennet.

The second short was ‘Melissa, Frankie and Hubert’ which, through flashbacks, told the story of a couple after the return of the husband who had previously walked out. Rosa French’s script was touching and funny, and the play captured moments of love between a couple, as well as the doubt that comes with growing up and committing.

The next two were comedy plays, firstly ‘Three’s a Crowd’ from the perspective of a cleaner eager to go home after a day working at a Bed & Breakfast. It was a look into the B&B owner’s love life, filled with awkward tension as the title ‘Three’s a Crowd’ suggests. Then came ‘This One Has Nazis In’ a comedy sketch about a secret plot to kill Hitler, involving sycophantic cabinet ministers, a cocaine consuming Hitler and a ‘chair Nazi’ joke. As a seemingly incompetent spy tries to assassinate Hitler, it had the audience laughing almost constantly,

The night ended on the haunting ‘The Fence’ a story of a controlling aunt and a young girl’s nightmares. A visually terrifying play, it was a slightly melancholic note to end a night of mostly comedy plays. However, as a showcase of the drama students, the evening displayed how much talent and enthusiasm there is.