Alex Grenfell

Nothing quite captures the mechanical bleakness of cyberpunk like Hans Zimmer’s masterful score for Blade Runner 2049. Zimmer reimagines Vangelis’s original score, including the infamous Tears in the Rain, using a 1980’s Yamaha CS-80 synthesizer for additional authenticity, while adding the same electronically-orchestral feel he became known for with Arrival and Inception. Every song corresponds perfectly with Villeneuve’s images of barren wastelands and dwarfing metropolises, to evoke the dystopian atmosphere characterising this science-fiction masterpiece. 

James Ward :

My favourite film soundtrack is for ‘The Lord of the Rings’ trilogy, composed by Howard Shore. The symbiotic relationship between the visuals and sounds has never been so true as in this series. The initial idyll of the Shire is beautiful and really sets the peaceful tone, only being made more powerful a contrast by the intense symphonies seen at moments like the Mines of Moria, and the siege of Helms Deep.

Molly Bernardin

‘Ladybird’ opens with Alanis Morrisette’s ‘Hand in My Pocket’ – an anthem of contradictions which thematically reflects Ladybird’s character. The song not only reflects character to audiences, but also reminds her of her own identity. The music Ladybird loves separates her from other characters and draws attention to the differences between her and those around her. Dave Matthews Band’s ‘Crash into Me’ also serves as a catalyst for Ladybird to reaffirm her identity and leave unfulfilling relationships. The soundtrack to ‘Ladybird’ is so iconic not only because of the songs themselves, but the way they further character development. The music is not ‘an extra’ in an incredible film – but a foundation on which the film depends.


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