Most travellers have bucket lists, and if other travellers’ bucket lists are anything like mine, they are infinitely long. I have come to find that my bucket list has changed in nature over my years of wanting to explore, and in turn have realised there is an art to it.

For reasons which I do not understand, I was stuck in the mentality of ticking countries off of my ‘list’ to then never need to return to them. It doesn’t make any sense, does it? Eight of my family holidays since I was six have been to the same destination, so my wanderlust meant that I felt the need to play catch up.

Based on this preposterous theory of mine, because I went on a school trip to Lake Garda and Venice in Italy when I was nine, Italy was done with. Subsequently, I didn’t care about Rome, Pompeii, Florence or any of the other amazing places in Italy because I had already been to the country. Luckily, however, I have grown out of this ridiculous mindset.

I have three scratch maps in my room; a world map, a cities checklist and a landmark and sights checklist, and as superficial as it is, these maps made me see the light. The cities map details 100 places worth visiting, and funnily enough, there are some countries that are repeated, because there are multiple places in each country worth visiting. Who knew?

So, that leads to the question at hand. What is the best type of bucket list to keep? The definition of ‘best’, of course, is arbitrary, but in my opinion, any list that prevents a broad box-ticking mentality from emerging can be considered effective. Basically, a deconstructed bucket list which transcends countries or regions. Categorise it instead by landmarks, cities, activities or types of travel, or alternatively, a mix of all of the above, like mine.

The things that are at the top of my bucket lists are to climb Mount Kilimanjaro, spend time in Rio de Janeiro, complete a European road trip and see Machu Picchu. I would rather have a longer and more specific bucket list that details all the exciting things I would be doing around the world, over simply listing the countries. My bucket list above is much more interesting than ‘Tanzania, Brazil, Europe, Peru’ and so on.

As an avid traveller, my bucket list is quite lengthy, and I am always adding to it. Breaking it down even further means it is longer and more stacked with exciting potential trips, which I am certainly not complaining about. If you haven’t got a bucket list, use my advice and start one! Sorry in advance for any crippling wanderlust you may experience as a result.