Cards Against Humanity gives us the chance to reveal our inner dark humour, to laugh, to cry and largely to insult. I first bought the game as a fresher; a small group in my flat thought it would be a good way to spend time together. No quicker than you can say Jade Goodies’ cancerous remains, I was logged into Amazon Prime with the game in my shopping basket. Over the course of the next few months, we played the game on an almost weekly basis. We would play music, sit in the idle of our corridor and sometimes eat pizza together. Playing the game created such an amazing sense of community, even though we were being horrible human beings.

The card game has become so popular that you can buy expansion packs to give yourself more variety when playing. Versions of the game are also available for US and UK citizens. I believe that this divide is key. The British sense of humour is renowned for being dry and sarcastic – the kind of humour that wouldn’t go down well in America. The kind of humour that is perfect for a card game such as Cards Against humanity.

Occasionally I come across people who have played the game but have made the decision to remove certain cards as they find them too offensive. The cards most frequently removed are the one about Madeleine McCann and Jade Goody. Personally, I think that unless you had never heard about the card game before you decided to play, then you knew exactly what you were getting yourself into. The game is designed to reveal the darkest sense of humours, to be racist, homophobic and misogynistic. It goes against all morality and humanity. You shouldn’t be surprised if a combination appears so horrific that all that remains is to laugh.

One trick I have picked up in my years of playing the game, is to use ‘amnesty’. ‘Amnesty’ is a good option to take when everyone playing the game has exhausted all of their good cards and are left with a poor hand. ‘Amnesty’ enables all players to switch five cards in their hand for five new cards, in the hopes of making the game more interesting. It’s easy to recognise when you will have difficulty matching a card you hold to question card. This crafty trick enables the game to last for even longer. It simply is the game that keeps on giving! 

Another trick of the trade is to place a random answer card in the mix and have the cards shuffled. If the random cards even get picked, it just demonstrates how the card games reliance on the creation of crazy combinations can still be the most hilarious. This is also a perfect solution if you only have a small group playing the game.

Cards against humanity provides a good outlet for the players to use their wit and creativity in creating the most horrific and socially unacceptable combinations.


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