Brexit Party: Alexander Gilchrist

“I’m in it to win it here”

“More proportional representation is required”

To Alexander Gilchrist, “what the Brexit Party stands for is democracy and rights.”

He says it embodies a range of “various different political spectrums,” referencing his own experiences of being “on marches at Burston with Jeremy Corbyn” as an example that the Brexit Party is not inherently hard-right.

It’s about “changing politics for good.” He suggests reducing the number of MPs, reforming the “unelected House of Lords” and setting up an “official online forum” to give voters greater participation in Parliament would all be positive changes.

Brexit is “the first step of many” to “change party politics for good.”

 

Conservatives: Dr Michael Spencer

“Fundamentally the NHS has never had funding cuts”

“It’s in our nature to protect the poorest”

The Conservatives are making their successes the focus of their campaign. In the last few years, their climate policy has been the most ambitious of any G20 country and they have a 2050 carbon neutral plan. They’ve also got a very defined Brexit policy, getting out with Boris Johnson’s deal by the 31st of January. Mike Spencer, Conservative candidate for Norwich South, thinks that healing the divide across the country is the most vital thing, and that we need to rebuild trust in politicians.

 

Catherine Rowett: Green Party 

“The climate emergency is the big issue we have to solve now”

“We need to spend wisely on a more equal society”

The Green Party have got their agenda in their name. The climate crisis is the most important thing for them right now, and they have the most ambitious and wide-ranging plan to stop in. They are promising £1tn over 10 years to tackle climate change. They also think they have the best Brexit plan – campaigning for another referendum and Remain. They want to stay inside the EU and fix what they can, rather than leaving and doing nothing. Their other policies include tackling inequality, further funding for the NHS, placing greater importance on mental health, and improving the educational system.

 

Labour Party: Clive Lewis

“The NHS was built by the Labour Party and it will be defended by the Labour Party”

“We’ve got a voting system that isn’t fit for the 19th Century, let alone the 21st”

A former journalist, Clive Lewis highlights Labour’s proposal for a national commission on fake news in the wake of the “Putinesque style of disinformation” adopted by the Conservatives in the wake of FactCheckUK.

On Brexit, he confirms Labour’s position “as a remain party,” defending a second referendum as the best solution. “Simply revoking Article 50 doesn’t really resolve the underlying problems.”

On the NHS, he proposes resolving underlying societal issues alongside a £1.6 billion “sticking plaster” investment into mental health, “because fairer societies are… healthier societies, and… most of the social science backs that up.”

 

James Wright: Liberal Democrats

“We were a minority partner in a coalition government and we did make a mistake on tuition fees”

“We’re talking about legalising cannabis for personal use, regulated by government”

The Liberal Democrats are basing most of their campaign around stopping Brexit. If they win outright, they will simply revoke Article 50, however if they are not in a majority, they will continue to campaign for a confirmatory People’s Vote. Other key policies concern marijuana legalisation, a ‘skills wallet’ to encourage retraining and education, and the introduction of a proportional voting system. Norwich South candidate James Wright hopes that students can look past the ‘mistakes’ of his party regarding tuition fees and instead support them for their track record on other policies, such as equal marriage.


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