As someone who loves all things creative, isolation has proved to be incredibly beneficial in most ways. I have, knowing it was a bad idea, neglected my summative essays for the longest time (I’ll submit them on time, I promise), and instead, have focused on doing things that I love, and rediscovering things that I used to love.

I love to write. I always have. Although, since I came to university, I’ve found myself doing it less and less. Maybe because it’s part of my degree, I wanted to spend my time doing anything that isn’t related to that degree. It’s been a long time since I did any writing on my own, but lately, that’s changed.

Since the lockdown began, I have, like many others, found myself with a lot more time on my hands. Soon after I came home, inspiration struck, and I was able to write pages and pages of story. Sure, it wasn’t my best writing, but it was nice to remember how much I love putting words on a page. When I’m writing, I forget about everything that is going on in the world; it’s just me and my imagination.

Isolation has also been a great time to start reading some of the hundred or more books on my to-be-read list. Having so much time to read has also helped with my creativity. As they say, great writers are always avid readers. Escaping to another world, or getting inside a character’s head, always leaves me with inspiration and the desire to create my own worlds and characters, be it in prose or even scriptwriting, which I developed a love for thanks to a module last semester. 

I’ve also taken up new hobbies such as drawing, and different crafts, like painting and scrapbooking; these are things I haven’t done in a long time, but I’m rediscovering them now. I’m no Leonardo Da Vinci or Pablo Picasso, but art is a fun way to spend all these hours at home, and there’s a certain satisfaction at seeing or holding something you’ve made.

Despite all the good this isolation has done for my creativity, I’ll admit that it has allowed some bad habits to form. I definitely stay in bed for a lot longer in the mornings, and there’s always that part of me that just wants to binge another show on Netflix, or waste an entire day on Animal Crossing or The Sims 4. I have nothing to really look forward to right now, and sometimes that impacts me in the worst ways. For me, isolation has affected me in the best and worst ways, giving me motivation to create, and sometimes giving me no motivation at all, allowing me to waste the days away.

Is that necessarily a bad thing though? These are unprecedented times, and there’s no shame in having a lazy day. For many people, being stuck at home all day might prove negative for their creativity. After all, everyone finds inspiration in different places.


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