South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s film Parasite has been the film on everybody’s lips, generating buzz from Hollywood and far beyond. Buzz within the film industry can often result in a film being overhyped and not living up to the high expectations it has been held to, but that is not the case here.  Parasite deserves to win the Oscar for Best Picture as Bong has created a story that is able to elicit fear, empathy, anxiety and thrill within his viewers, all while incorporating humour and stunning cinematography.

The way the plot unfolds is perfect, we are taken on a journey of prosperity and tragedy beginning in the confined basement of the Kim family witnessing the incommodious of their living conditions and the world of unemployment and poverty, before following the family as they slither their way into wealth and infiltrate the jobs of the Park family. One of my favourite aspects of the film is its unpredictability, the thrill of thinking you can guess what will happen next and being proved wrong time and time again. One of my personal favourite parts of the film is the montage before the second half of the film, where Bong manages to fit several shots each telling a different story, with dramatic classical music and rhythmic changes all setting up for the movies’ stark change in tone. 

Parasite encourages viewers to think deeper, providing important commentary on the detachment between wealth and meritocracy. Being the rollercoaster ride that it is, Parasite has many qualities that its competitors simply do not have, therefore if the Oscars can take a break in its obsession with White-American films, then perhaps Bong & Co will win their deserved Oscar.