In spite of mixed critical reception, King of the Monsters serves as a powerful continuation of Legendary Pictures’ Monsterverse series and as a love letter to long-time fans as well as the franchise’s pioneers. The film hosts some of the most impressive cinematography seen this year, with the true weight of its super-sized stars being conveyed through well-choreographed fights and beautifully lit shots. Whether heroic or villainous, the sight of each and every kaiju is rendered in an outstanding fashion. Nowhere is this better demonstrated than the glorious chase scene in which the human characters lure the oversized pterodactyl Rodan into the path of the enraged hydra King Ghidorah, setting the scene for an enthralling airborne skirmish. The soundtrack respects its roots by incorporating not only old-school motif themes, but also the numerous classic stomps and roars of Godzilla and his co-stars. King of the Monsters realises its place as a thoroughly non-allegorical iteration of the nuclear-powered reptile, instead thriving as one of the most enjoyable action-focused Godzilla films in his 55-year tenure.