Science / 13/04/2021 Plastic times call for drastic measures

Plastics have taken the world by storm ever since their invention in 1869. They have made material wealth more easily accessible, provided practical solutions to shortages in natural resources through wars, and, astonishingly, were even hailed as being an environmentally friendly resource (as they could easily imitate things like ivory, horns and tortoiseshell). Nowadays, the...

Science / 13/04/2021 Gut microbiome disruption links to certain Parkinson’s disease symptoms

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that results in the loss of brain cells responsible for secreting the neurotransmitter dopamine. Dopamine’s role in motor control is a key contributor to the characteristic symptoms of Parkinson’s, including tremors, reduced mobility and muscle stiffness.  Diagnosis is often centred around the loss of motor control, however,...

Science / 13/04/2021 One small step too far into sci-fi?

Artificial intelligence has consistently cropped up in science fiction for decades. As science continues to advance, we are getting closer to making machines with human-like intelligence a reality. The ability of AI to mimic the way the human brain works, to learn from examples, recognise objects and make decisions allows these machines to perform tasks...

Science / 13/04/2021 Long Covid –is it all in the genes?

Cambridge scientists are studying whether our genes play an important part in determining who develops long Covid and who is spared. Vertigo, extreme fatigue, breathlessness, brain fog and fainting – according to the Office of National Statistics (ONS) long Covid has left approximately 1.1 million UK citizens with debilitating symptoms, in some cases, for months...

Science / 23/03/2021 What biases are in our healthcare systems?

Considering that healthcare has dominated the headlines, ruled our social media feeds and lingered in our conscience for the last 12 months, now is not a bad time to delve into some nursing related research and smash out a healthcare dissertation. My topic came to me in strands and required some effort to weave together...

Science / 23/03/2021 Nice to meteor you

It’s not every day a meteorite lands on your driveway, let alone one that could help explain the mysteries of the formation of our solar system – but that’s exactly what happened to a family in Gloucestershire. Just before 10pm on Saturday 28th February, a blazing fireball in the night sky captivated thousands of eyewitnesses...

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Science

Hygiene equality is no longer a luxury

The start of the new year has brought in the abolition of the ‘tampon tax’, a policy deemed by many to be ‘sexist’ and a perpetuation of gender equality which does not belong in today’s society – a zero rate of VAT now applies to all sanitary products in the UK. The move was finally…

Science

2020: Hottest year on record or not?

According to the European Union’s climate monitoring service, 2020 has tied with 2016 as the hottest year on record. To many this has come as no surprise in a year that has seen devastating bushfires across Australia, increasingly thinning Arctic ice, a wild Atlantic hurricane season, and the hottest temperature recorded in human history at…

Science

Snapshots

Design for Mary Anning statue revealed The design has been revealed for a statue of pioneering paleontologist Mary Anning in her hometown of Lyme Regis. The campaign, led by 13-year-old Evie Swire, is crowdfunding for the statue in a bid to celebrate Anning’s achievements which went unrecognised throughout her life due to her gender and…

Science

Are GM crops in the UK’s future?

This month, the government launched a consultation into gene editing for livestock and crops in England. This aims to explore the pros and cons of genetic modification (GM) which is strictly regulated in the EU, deciding whether it could be a successful tool in post-Brexit agriculture. Currently, 60% of processed food in the USA contains…

Science

An Arctic Refuge

Trump’s oil development scheme for sale of Alaskan Arctic Wildlife Refuge land to energy companies appears unlikely to survive, due to the auction’s lack of real interest on January 6th. According to Anchorage Daily News, the profit was significantly less than anticipated, selling 11 out of 22 land tracts for a total $14.4 million, instead…

Science

How do the coronavirus vaccines work?

Since the global outbreak of COVID-19 there has been an urgent search for a potential vaccine. Many classic, well-understood vaccines work by injecting a dead or weakened form of the target virus into the body. This helps the patient build immunity by triggering the immune system response, aiding the body for future recognition and response…

Science

Can we actually read our dreams?

Dreams have long been associated as portals for divine wisdom. The ancient Egyptians and Greeks declared them the messenger service of the Gods, and described dreams as visitations from the heavens. Even in recent times, many notable figures have claimed their most famous ideas have come to them in dreams. Mary Shelley bore Frankenstein from…


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