Here’s the premise: an old man, extra spiteful during a season meant for joy, taken through a series of short misadventures intended to change his wicked ways forever with the help of several ghosts. He’s a better person for it and all the viewers learn to follow his example. But what if you wanted to see it go the other way? What if the ghosts had decided to push the man into a serial rage and advise him on a killing spree? What if the man was a little younger so he could wield a fire axe firmly; isolating himself and his family at a supposedly magical holiday sight, a winter themed hotel… 

It’s a creepy way of watching Stanley Kubrick’s thriller masterpiece sure, but doesn’t it relate? The Torrance family spends months alone accompanied by snow, fireplaces, kids’ toys and sweaters. The ghosts of the building are seen dressed to the best for a new year’s celebration. Don’t we ourselves get irate over how the holidays seem to start earlier and go on longer? Perhaps Scrooge had a point. Jack Torrance has had enough of merely mumbling humbug, and wants to go to the extreme in ending this holiday, and you get to watch it. 

You don’t want to be jolly this year; you are looking for some fear. You don’t want Tiny Tim, instead have Delirious Danny. The ghost of Christmas Yet-To-Come doesn’t sum to much when you look into the silent face of the Dogman. I remember commenting on ‘The Shining a few years back as a “Dickensian dystopia”, maybe it’s far fetched but for people who are over the classic Wallace and Gromit mornings, and Home Alone afternoons (even including what I call the Die Hard half-hour, where everyone comments over the television of how the Bruce Willis movie is in fact a Christmas classic even though everyone already agrees), it’s worth experimenting with something that defies the same code. So why not spice it up? Deck the halls with an elevator of blood this Christmas and think: was that article comparing a Stephen King story to Ebenezer Scrooge really that far-fetched?   

What do you think?