Fashion, OldVenue

Style winners and losers of London 2012

The Olympic Games were outstanding. Everyone was excited and all eyes were on the athletes. In turn, this meant all eyes were on their clothes (or lack of, as the case was at times). Some stood out as flattering, but even in the Olympics you can get a fashion faux pas or two. This is a collection of the brilliant and the absurd.

It may sometimes be disregarded as a proper sport, but gymnastics is one of the most captivating events to watch. In theory, nobody in their right mind should admire all that glitter on such remarkably small human beings. That much should weigh them down, surely? How do they do all that flying around in such an elegant manner? But like a magpie that collects shiny things, you can’t take the eyes off them and you’re dazzled.

The intricacy of the detailing somehow makes it sophisticated. Or maybe that’s just avoiding the truth that you want to pull off the leotards just like they do. Although, I’m of the opinion that some of these gymnasts are taking all that glitter too far.

Take Gabrielle Douglas of the USA; her leotard was utterly ridiculous, donning a futuristic, metallic silver costume. Rather than dazzle me, it reminded me of a very bendy Lady Gaga.

I’ve already put it off for too long: Tom Daley. He received a lot of press in the Olympics. In case you didn’t notice, he was wearing a teeny tiny Speedo. If only every man who dared wear a Speedo had the body of Tom Daley. Who knew that so little material could do so much for London 2012?

The outfits were impressive. They looked good yet showed we meant business. Either with “Great Britain” boldly stated across the top or the Union Jack loud and proud, they were simple, sporty, but with the important message that we can combine sports and style.

Furthermore, you can’t get any better than the sartorial choices of the fans that turned up to the Olympics, lucky enough to get tickets, and all the people at home watching it who still dressed up regardless. When I was there I was overwhelmed by the hoards of red, blue and white walking through.

The excitement was too much when the Union Jack onesies came out to play – Ollie Locke from Made in Chelsea would have fitted right in with his Union Jack attire. It was the two weeks where everyone could go OTT; it absolutely didn’t matter, and I loved witnessing it.

The USA did brilliantly, with big US flag hats (America weren’t going to remain on the sidelines while Team GB had their time in the spotlight as the hosts). I particularly enjoyed the Netherlands – I’ve been loving orange lately and oh, they do it so well.

It’s almost as though Sweden recognised the success the Netherlands were having with their spectacular orange zest … although I’m not sure why they selected the least humorous way to be noticed. Their cycling helmets were bright orange and looked like they belonged on Mario Kart.

Further hilarious oddities were to be enjoyed with the Czech’s opening ceremony outfits, complete with umbrellas and wellies, a light-hearted reference to Great Britain’s reputation for plentiful rain.

Such quirky choices, as well as the sporting events themselves, made the London 2012 Olympic Games two perfect weeks of pride, style and even some humour. The fans and audiences had the best outfits by far. Nothing showed the excitement of the Olympics more than the way people expressed it through their clothing and style.

21/09/2012

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kirstenpowley



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