It can be disheartening to work so hard on an assessment, only to receive a ‘bad’ grade and for many people, it can make them question why they are even at university and why they should continue.

However, a hack to university life is to stop putting so much emphasis on the grades and pay equal attention to the other opportunities and experiences that you can gain outside of the course. Graduating with a top degree is undeniably amazing, however this does not guarantee you will have the right experience and skills in order to do better than an individual who is less academically successful yet has a wide breadth of people skills and has experienced all other parts that university has to offer them.

One of the best ways to leave university as a well-rounded, happy and employable individual is to engage actively with societies, get some form of part-time job and take advantage of your universities career service advice.

Engaging with societies can be a brilliant way of getting good experience in a field you are interested in. For example, if you want to go into journalism, joining the student newspaper will not only look great on your CV as it is real life experience, but you’ll be interacting and building connections with real people and forming lasting relationships.

Any form of part-time job, whether that be on campus, online or in the city is a great way to show future employers that you can manage time well, even if it just for a few hours a week. Part time jobs earn you some money and give you lots of useful practical experience that you can take into job interviews and use as communication enhancement.

Getting to know and use your campus career service is another brilliant way to start building up the best version of yourself. They often offer practice interviews, and always give out helpful advice about where to find opportunities you may be interested in. Some even offer award programmes that you can use to enhance your CV.

By no means is this an encouragement to completely drop your studies, but a guide to what you could be doing alongside your education. There are other important things you can focus on rather than simply a number. So next time you feel down that you have not got a first, remember all the other things you can do to not only improve your mental health and well-being, but employability too. Don’t be defined by a number, get out there and take advantage of all opportunities your university has to offer.

What do you think?